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Menu revealed for Devon’s new vegan street food cafe

The menu for Devon’s new vegan street food cafe has been revealed – and it sounds amazing.

Nourish Plant Based Cafe is being opened by Liz Perry, who will be bringing a selection of vegan street food to Teignmouth.

The new addition to the seaside town will open as a cafe and takeaway that will serve pizzas, wraps, falafel and cakes.

Liz, who has been a vegetarian all of her life and vegan for the past five years said she has always had a passion for food.

“Opening up my own cafe serving plant-based food is something I have always wanted to do,” she said.

 

“So many people choose to be vegetarian or vegan now so I think there’s definitely a gap in the market for something like this in Teignmouth.

“I have always loved good food and growing my own food so that’s something we will be doing when we open.”

 

Nourish will replace a sandwich shop, and Liz hopes to be open and up and running by May.

She added: “I get the keys to the shop in April and there’s quite a bit of work to do before we open.

“There were certain foods I missed when I became vegan but not so much anymore and there are so many alternatives to try.

“There will be no cardboard sandwiches served at the cafe.”

What is on the menu?

Breakfast will be served until 11.30am and includes, homemade vegan muffins or crumpets, a breakfast bowl, a vegan fry-up and vegan pancakes.

Wraps and toasties will be served all day and include:

  • Garlic mushrooms, rockets sundried tomatoes and soft cheese
  • Refried beans, roasted veg, spinach, creme fraiche and guacamole
  • Mozzarella, pesto, pinenuts, tomato, sweetcorn and spring onion
  • Hummus, spinach, bean salad, tomatoe salsa and house aioli

Other items on the menu include soup of the day pizza, warm falafel wrap and bruschetta.

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Food and drink in Devon

Liz is also on the look out for staff to work at Nourish when the cafe opens.

She said: “We’re looking for an enthusiastic, happy and reliable team at Nourish.

Watch the video below to find out how to make vegan doughnuts

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“They must have amazing customer service skills and be willing to work weekends.”

To apply for job you can get in touch with Liz at Nourish090@gmail.com.

Man taken to hospital after collapsing in house fire

A man was rescued from his house in South Devon after a fire broke out.

He collapsed in the doorway of the property, on Deans Close, Bishopsteignton, but fire crews rescued him, and he was taking to hospital for precautionary checks.

The fire service were called to the house just before 7pm on Sunday after the alarm was sounded.

One fire engine from Teignmouth was sent to investigate the cause.

The fire broke out at a house on Deans Close

 

A spokesman for Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service said: “Once the crew arrived the officer in charge confirmed alarms were sounding, a smell of burning and the occupant believed to still be within the property.

“The crew got to work immediately to rescue the male who had collapsed in the doorway of the property.  

“The male was successfully rescued and is now being taken to hospital for precautionary checks.

“The property was made safe by the crew and naturally ventilated due to the heavy smoke logging.”

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The cause of this fire is believed to be accidental.

Fire-hit Devon waste firm marches on with expansion plans

A Devon Waste firm that has risen from the ashes after a devastating fire has expanded with a new venture in South Devon.

Devon Contract Waste, based at Marsh Barton in Exeter has bought the trade waste rounds of County Skip Hire in Torquay, Paignton, Brixham, Teignmouth, Newton Abbot, Bovey Tracey, Totnes, Exeter and all surrounding areas.

It follows DCW’s recent expansion from Devon across the whole of Cornwall and means it takes on 380 more commercial clients.

DCW managing director, Simon Almond, said: “I’m delighted to welcome County Skip Hire’s trade waste clients into the DCW fold. This move continues our expansion across the south west and our mission to support sustainability in the region.

 

“County Skip Hire’s customers can be confident they are in good hands. We pride ourselves on our 99.6% collection success rate, which is backed by outstanding customer service.

“As an established independent operator, we understand the challenges faced by local businesses when it comes to managing their waste costs and environmental impact. From confusion over what can be recycled to restricted access in rural locations, our experienced team has seen it all and is capable of meeting each customer’s unique needs.”

Work started late last year to build a new HQ for the firm after a huge blaze destroyed the headquarters in March 2017, which was built with the same cladding associated with the Grenfell tragedy.


More than one hundred firefighters from across Devon were called to the company’s envirohub when fire broke out last March.

The fire ripped through the building in just 17 minutes, completely destroying the building.

The new build will handle up to 75,000 tonnes of mixed waste and recycling each year. The space-efficient facility will also house a secure data destruction centre, capable of processing up to six tonnes of confidential waste per hour; an on-site vehicle maintenance workshop; and a two-level office suite to accommodate the growing team.

 

In addition to sustainably sourced materials, the building will include up to 200 solar panels to supply the building’s electricity needs, electric vehicle charging points, air source heat pumps, low-energy LED lighting and energy efficient glass.

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The 50 best restaurants and cafes in Devon (Spring 2019)

Devon is packed full of fantastic restaurants, cafes and street-food vendors – all vying to serve you delicious food and a great selection of drinks.

Visiting one of the county’s wonderful eateries offers the perfect opportunity to sample the local cuisine, as well as spend quality time with friends and family.

From fine-dining establishments by the coast to hidden gems, it can be difficult to choose the right place to spend your hard-earned money.

So to help you out, here’s a list of 50 of the best eateries in Devon, according to TripAdvisor.

Click the links below to read the reviews and book your table.

Small World Tapas, Torquay


This family-friendly eatery in Torquay allows diners to peek at the kitchen while the chef is cooking worldwide tapas – not only from Spain but from all around the world. The menu is changed often to showcase the best of every country.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Number Eight, Bideford

This small fine-dining restaurant is situated in the heart of Bideford and serves fine British food along with providing great service and a warming atmosphere. All the food is prepared fresh using the best locally-sourced produce the restaurant can find.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

The Orange Tree Restaurant, Torquay

Tucked away just a few steps from Torquay harbour, The Orange Tree is renown for its seasonally-changing a la carte menu offering modern British-European cuisine complemented by warm and friendly hospitality.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

The Gateway Tea Room & Cafe, Moretonhampstead

On the edge of high Dartmoor, the Gateway is the perfect English tea room that offers the best of traditional food and drink, combined with exciting modern cosmopolitan cuisine at reasonable prices.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Memories Bistro, Torquay

Set in the premises of what was once St Marychurch’s oldest coaching inn, this Torquay venue’s interior is a treasure in itself. All the delicious food is prepared and cooked in the kitchen with fresh fish from Brixham served with lovely home-made sauces and all meat, game and poultry is free-range and sourced locally.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

 

Red Panda Exeter


At this small, Asian-inspired takeaway in Exeter, food is always freshly-made using sustainably-sourced ingredients and local produce, packed with flavours of Southeast Asian and East Asian cuisines. Many vegan options are also available.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Bianca e massimo, Totnes

Choose a healthier option at this Totnes restaurant that produces vegetarian and vegan, natural foods to enjoy. The team at the eatery personally choose all of the products and ingredients and so they come from enchanted hills on a volcanic lake, from a local organic farm, or even from small orchards in the South of Italy.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Nelly May’s Parlour, Ilfracombe


This traditional tearoom on The High Street in Ilfracombe, oozes olde worlde character and charm – with part of the tearoom dating from Tudor times. A perfect choice for an exquisitely scrumptious breakfast, lunch, coffee, cream or afternoon tea or homemade cake.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Cornwall Street Fish Bar, Plymouth


This popular restaurant and takeaway in Plymouth is a firm favourite with visitors and locals alike, serving fresh fish and crispy chips, along with plenty of other delicious options.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

@Kitchen Asian Cuisine, Plymouth

Specialising in serving Thai, Vietnamese and Japanese food, head chef Pon creates exquisite and decorative dishes which tantalise the tastebuds. It is aptly dubbed one of Plymouth’s ‘best kept secrets’ due to its location nestled away on The Mezzanine of the market.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

 

The Cross Street Cafe, Moretonhampstead


This wonderful cafe on the edge of Dartmoor National Park offers home-cooked food, great coffee and craft beer that can be enjoyed with friends and family.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Lytehouse, Brixham

Serving modern, British dishes alongside the best wines in Brixham, Lythouse is well-known for having passion for food, wine and service. The menu reflects fresh, local and seasonal produce and all dishes are made in-house, every day.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Finley Brown’s Cafe, Teignmouth


This coffee house in Teignmouth boasts a large and tasty menu, all of which is made to order. The friendly team uses local produce where it can and also makes as much as it can from scratch. All of the cakes and scones are handmade in the cafe.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

The Italian Kitchen, Bideford

A wonderful pizzeria creating delicious wood-fired pizzas made from fresh ingredients. The fresh dough is prepared daily on the premises in Bideford and the fantastic team are successfully bringing southern Italy to Devon.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Jolly Good Fish Cafe, Teignmouth


Hailed by one TripAdvisor reviewer as ‘the best fish and chips in Teignmouth‘, Jolly Good Fish provide customers with just that – with a service to match!

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

 

Weavers Cottage Tea Shoppe, Torquay


This family-run business is situated in the heart of the picturesque Cockington Village, Torquay, serving award-winning cream teas, light lunches, speciality teas and coffees and luxury Langage Farm ice cream.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Old Vienna Restaurant, Torquay

This fine-dining restaurant in Torquay offers artisan cuisine made from seasonal local produce. Created with the Austrian touch, the food here is both tasty and beautiful to look at, providing a unique continental dining experience.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Instow Barton Restaurant, Instow

Instow Barton restaurant is a small and intimate dining experience, set within a beautiful farmhouse in Bideford. The menu changes weekly using seasonal and local produce. In the summer months the on-site vegetable garden supplies the restaurant.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Royal Windsor Tea Room, Restaurant and Carvery, Torquay

This Torquay favourite provides a unique experience for all as well as delicious dishes including everything from freshly carved meats to  all-day breakfasts or their very own version of a tantalising cod and chips.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Green Leaf Cafe, Torquay


This independent family-run cafe in Torquay offers breakfast and light lunches, with a varied menu. Its coffee is locally roasted, and you can also enjoy loose-leaf teas and hot chocolate. The tasty lunch menu includes healthy options, vegetarian dishes, and delicious chefs’ specials, as well as a large selection of vegan dishes.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

 

Relish Bar & Bistro, Ilfracombe

Specialising in quality, fresh seafood meals including its very own seafood platter featuring whole Lundy lobster, dressed crab, crevettes, mussels, and crayfish tails, this eatery located in the heart of Ilfracombe’s oldest street is truly fantastic.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Memories Restaurant, Northam


This fine dining restaurant in Northam has been owned and run by a dedicated husband-and-wife team since 2000. Relax and enjoy delicious food and drink in a friendly atmosphere.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

New Inn Public House, Barnstaple

Using the best produce from Devon’s rich larder, there’s a range of homemade starters, mains and puddings at this popular pub to tantalise your taste buds. The New Inn in Barnstaple specialises in high-quality home cooked pub fare, with traditional British favourites offered alongside exotic dishes from further afield.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Beth’s Bistro, Dartmouth


Situated on Lower Street in Dartmouth, Beth’s Bistro serves delicious homemade food which is freshly cooked to order. The friendly team prides itself in sourcing good-quality local produce.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Royal Oak Farm, Honiton


This pick-your-own-fruit farm and traditional English tea room in Honiton is set in the stunning Blackdown Hills, and serves award-winning cream teas and light lunches.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

 

The Corner Bistro, Braunton


This relaxed and genuine French restaurant aims to serve quality local products with a French twist. Now Boasting a Garden for drinks and nibbles, The Corner Bistro also caters for vegetarians and vegans.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Fresco, Teignmouth

Fresco’s in Teignmouth is run by a friendly couple, Marco and Cherry Tavoso, and is built on the principles of creating excellent quality authentic Italian cuisine and providing a high level of efficient and friendly service.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Miss Fea’s Cafe, Mortehoe


This fully-licenced cafe specialises in homemade goods, especially cake, which are all made from scratch, along with sweet and savoury options, great artisan coffee and speciality teas.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

The Old Forge Caffe & Restaurant, Chagford


The Chagford eatery serves a selection of modern British and authentic Continental and Mediterranean food, all homemade and locally-produced wherever possible, alongside a mouth-watering selection of freshly-made cakes and pastries – not to mention the famous Devon cream tea!

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

The Ring of Bells, Cheriton Fitzpaine


Located just a stone’s throw from Crediton and Tiverton, The Ring of Bells offers good-quality ingredients, cooked well, with flair and intrigue – all in a relaxed a professional atmosphere.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

 

Flame Factory, Appledore

The Appledore restaurant which is within a beautiful Georgian building, brings wood-fired pizza, flame-grilled burgers and rare-bred Clovelly Longhorn steaks to the historic Appledore quay side.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Conservatory Restaurant, Exeter

The majority of produce is locally-sourced from suppliers who share a passion for excellent food at this Exeter restaurant. The tasty dishes are created from scratch in the kitchen as chefs promise to provide diners with wonderful dining experiences.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Twenty Seven by Jamie Rogers, Kingsbridge

Using fresh local produce, skillfully prepared and served in a relaxed, vibrant environment, this Kingsbridge restaurant will provide the perfect atmosphere for a romantic meal.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

The Masons Arms Restaurant, Knowstone

This Knowstone hidden gem cooks up a storm and has been awarded one Michelin Star. It provides delicious local cuisine using only the finest ingredients presented with taste and style. The wonderful friendly service completes your experience in this first class restaurant or traditional bar area.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

The Galley Restaurant, Topsham


This Topsham restaurant prides itself on serving the freshest fish and seafood, simply and stylishly presented, together with exciting meat and vegetarian options sourced from local farms.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

 

The Southgate, Barnstaple

The 50 best restaurants and cafes in Devon (Spring 2019)

This licensed bar and grill in Barnstaple sources its ingredients locally, offering juicy steaks, ribs, burgers and chicken which is all freshly-cooked on the restaurant’s own flame grill.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

The Waddling Duck Bistro, Torquay


This traditional British bistro in Torquay is nestled in the heart of Wellswood and focuses on using seasonal ingredients and local produce. Sample delicious food from regularly-changing menus.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Someday Something, Sidmouth


Relax, unwind and enjoy the surroundings of Sidmouth from this trendy and unique tea room. Someday Something specialises in parties – whether that’s a baby shower, a wedding or a hen do.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Rodean Restaurant, Kenton


This small, family-run restaurant is recommended in the Michelin Guide. All food is prepared and cooked using local produce where possible. Watch out for our popular monthly ‘Wine & Dine’ events!

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

The Shack, Torquay


Tuck into one of The Shack’s burgers, which are hand-pressed and made locally using only prime South West aged beef with full traceability – together with a little touch of seasoning to provide that great taste.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

 

Emma’s Restaurant and Coffee House, Stoke Gabriel

This family-run restaurant in the heart of Stoke Gabriel serves a variety of tastes and caters for breakfast, lunch and dinner. This wonderful restaurant in Totnes makes eating out more affordable and all meals are prepared fresh to order.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

The Pyne Arms, Barnstaple


This traditional country pub in the small hamlet of East Down, is conveniently placed for visiting Exmoor and the North Devon coast. It offers locally-sourced food with a modern twist – with everything from a Sunday roast to speciality fish on the menu.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

The Fig Tree @36, Plymouth


This Michelin Guide-listed restaurant in Plymouth prides itself on being an independent family run eatery, providing locally-sourced food, professionally served in a relaxing, intimate and friendly environment.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Cafe Collective, Bideford

The 50 best restaurants and cafes in Devon (Spring 2019)

This dog-friendly cafe in Bideford offers delicious home-cooked food using locally-sourced produce. Its extensive menu includes a range of cooked breakfasts, lunches, homemade pizzas, sharing boards, homemade cakes and cream teas, with gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan diets also catered for.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

The Manor House Cafe, Ilfracombe


Pop in to this licenced cafe in Ilfracombe for rich ‘Devon roasted’ ground coffees, warming teas and luxurious hot chocolates – not to mention home-cooked and affordable family meals.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

 

The Harbour Seafood Restaurant and Takeaway, Plymouth


The Harbour in Plymouth specialises in fresh seafood landed meters away from the restaurant. With prime fillet and ribeye steaks to go with your seafood, lobster and crab is on the menu every day if you fancy a real treat.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

TJ’s Restaurant, Paignton


TJ’s boasts an outside terrace and dining room with probably one of the best views in The Bay. Customers can enjoy their food and look out across picturesque Paignton Harbour and along the stunning coastline to Torquay, Thatcher Rock and beyond.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Berto’s, Moretonhampstead


With a warm, cosy atmosphere and friendly staff, Berto’s is an authentic Italian pizza restaurant and takeaway which is situated in the scenic moorland town of Moretonhampstead.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Market Street Kitchen, Appledore


Formerly known as Susie’s Tea Rooms, this Appledore cafe serves delicious food and drinks in a warm and friendly atmosphere.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

Artillery Tower, Plymouth


This small, family-run restaurant is located within a 500-year-old artillery tower and offers views towards Plymouth Sound, Drake’s Island and Mount Edgcumbe. Sample delicious cooking which uses locally-sourced seasonal ingredients.

Click here for booking details and visitor reviews.

A massive step forward for a ‘national showcase’ Teign Estuary cycle route has been made

Progress has been made on plans for a cycle route that would be a ‘national showcase’ for the Teign Estuary.

Devon County Council’s cabinet supported a recommendation to proceed with a planning application for the proposed section of the multi-use trail between the Passage House Inn and Teignmouth.

It follows Teignbridge District Council’s decision last week to commit a £200,000 contribution towards the cost of preparing and submitting the application.

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Cllr Stuart Hughes, Devon County Council cabinet member for highway management, told the cabinet on Wednesday that it could be a ‘national showcase’ and much more than just a cycle route if it progressed.

Cllr Stuart Hughes, Devon County Council Cabinet Member for Highway Management
Cllr Stuart Hughes, Devon County Council Cabinet Member for Highway Management

He said: “The Teign Estuary Trail has always been a key part of the county council’s cycling strategy and completing the route would fill the current gap on the multi-use trail between Passage House Inn and Dawlish.

“At Dawlish, the route would connect to the Exe Estuary Trail, providing a high standard route to Exmouth via Exeter.

 

“We have seen Teignbridge commit funding to go towards the preparation of a planning application and we welcome their support. Further developing this route will provide substantial economic, health and environmental benefits in the area.”

The section between the Passage House Inn and Teignmouth would be divided into two sections.

From the Passage House Inn to Bishopsteignton, the majority of this route runs inland of the railway, while from Church Road in Bishopsteignton to the junction of Newfoundland Road and Morrisons in Teignmouth, it would use old sections of road to the north of the A381.

Teign Estuary Trail
Teign Estuary Trail

Cabinet members also supported a strategy to complete gaps in the trail between Passage House Inn and Dawlish. The trail would be accessible for walkers, cyclists, mobility scooter and wheelchair users.

 

Cllr Ron Peart, Devon County Councillor for Kingsteignton and Teign Estuary, said: “I’m extremely pleased that Devon County Council and Teignbridge District Council have made this commitment to progress with surveys, scheme design and planning for the trail. This is definitely a step in the right direction which will be welcomed by the many local people who support this project.”

Cllr Ron Peart
Cllr Ron Peart

Cllr Sylvia Russell, who represents Teignmouth, said that a national showcase was the right description as to what the route could be. She said: “We are still on the foothills and there is long way to go, but it is recognised that the stretch of road is very dangerous,so this is needed. We are moving forward and a great day for the cyclists of the area who have waited so long for this.”

Cllr Alistair Dewhirst, who represents the Ipplepen and the Kerswells ward, said that this will make a huge difference to the area. He said that residents in Teignmouth or Shaldon are trapped if they want to go by bike towards Newton Abbot and without the trail have a choice of two journeys – one on the dangerous A381 or on the very twisty, busy, and windy Shaldon Road.

 

He added: “This will have huge and amazing economic benefits as you can cycle from Exeter to Newton Abbot on the flat. It is a shame it has taken so long to get here, but we are here, so lets us go and deliver this and make it an absolute showpiece.”

Map showing the proposed routes for the Teign Estuary Trail
Map showing the proposed routes for the Teign Estuary Trail

The new trail, which has strong support from local communities and businesses, would help people enjoy the countryside and stay healthy, and would cost around £8m in total to deliver.

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Last week, Teignbridge District Council’s executive committee agreed spending £200,000 on preparing a planning application for the route, known as the Teign Estuary Trail, with councillors throwing their wholehearted support behind the cycle route that would mean cyclists would not have to take their life into their hands on the A381.

After the decision of the cabinet on Wednesday, Cllr Philip Bullivant, Teignbridge District Council’s executive member for recreation and leisure, said: “We welcome this support from Devon County Council. This expansion of the cycle path provision in Teignbridge, linking Newton Abbot to Teignmouth, will be a major step forward in promoting a healthier lifestyle for our residents and opens up a wonderful route along the Teign Estuary.

 

“The recent Local Plan review consultation highlighted strong local demand for the route and in response we are making this route a priority. We look forward to seeing the project delivered as soon as possible.”

Teign Estuary Trail connects Newton Abbot racecourse to Passage House
Teign Estuary Trail connects Newton Abbot racecourse to Passage House

The first section of the Teign Estuary Trail between Kingsteignton and Town Quay, in Newton Abbot, opened in 2013, with another stretch between Newton Abbot Racecourse and Passage House Inn opening last April.

From Passage House Inn to Teignmouth, design work and preparation of the planning application will continue, while initial investigations suggest that the section through Teignmouth town centre needs further exploration when suitable funding is available.

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A route has been identified for the section between Teignmouth and Holcombe, most of which could be delivered as permitted development, without the need for planning permission, if funding can be secured. However, there are ongoing discussions with Network Rail on the potential to provide facilities on this section.

A report to the cabinet had added: “Routes of this type are much more than just cycle routes: they are trails that are accessible to people walking, cycling and less able users with wheelchairs and mobility scooters, as demonstrated by experience on the Exe Estuary.

“Any extension to the existing Teign and Exe Estuary routes to connect Dawlish, Teignmouth and Newton Abbot would form a national showcase supporting local cycling utility trips, for example to work and education, providing economic and health benefits. In addition, the trail would link to an emerging network of routes centred on Newton Abbot and provide a much safer cycling alternative than the current A381.”

THE ROUTES

Passage House Inn to Bishopsteignton and Teignmouth

The route would be approximately 5km in length from the end of the current section at Passage House Inn to Bishopsteignton and Teignmouth. The section to Bishopsteignton runs over open land, inland of the railway. There would be a connection to Bishopsteignton which would enable local businesses, including the pub and hotel within Bishopsteignton village and the Passage House Inn, to benefit from additional trade.

Beyond Bishopsteignton the route has several constraints given the nature of the topography together with the proximity to the A381, neighbouring properties, the main west coast railway line and the estuary. A route on the northern side of the A381 has been identified to utilise sections of old highway segregated from the A381, as well as widening sections of existing footway, some set into the hillside to achieve desired path widths and provide estuary views.

This would stretch from Bishopsteignton for approximately 1.5km, terminating at the junction of the A381 with the entrance to Morrisons superstore/garage.

 Teignmouth

Within Teignmouth, pedestrians would use existing footways. A segregated cycle route is not currently possible as it is constrained by the urban environment. It is therefore proposed that the current Teign Estuary Trail strategy does not include sections within the Teignmouth urban environment beyond the junction of the A381 with the entrance to Morrisons.

 Teignmouth to Dawlish

A complete route between Teignmouth and Holcombe has been identified, beginning in Teignmouth town centre. Pedestrians could use the promenade adjacent to the railway. For cyclists the route would head northeast using quiet roads and public rights of way to the south and east of Eastcliffe Mules Park, before running on shared-use paths parallel to the A379 to Holcombe.

However, there are ongoing discussions with Network Rail regarding their plans to provide an improvement between Teignmouth and Holcombe and the potential to provide walking and cycling infrastructure as part of the public amenity aspect of the scheme. It is recommended that work on this section is paused whilst further clarity is sought from Network Rail.

Continuing northeast from Holcombe, the trail would continue along shared use paths parallel to the main A379 to reach Dawlish.

Date set for planning inquiry into controversial 1,210 Newton Abbot new homes plan

A date has been set for a planning inquiry into controversial plans to build more than 1,000 new homes on the edge of Newton Abbot.

The outline scheme, submitted by PCL Planning on behalf of the Rew family, would see 1,210 new homes built on the rolling green hills of Wolborough Barton.

They also involved a new primary school, employment land, community facilities, including a day nursery and a health centre, a local shopping centre, play area, allotments and a multi-use games area, as well as a link road connecting the A380 and the A381.

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Also included in the plans is a new boutique hotel in place of the Wolborough Farmstead,  for which full planning permission is asked for.

Teignbridge District Council’s planning committee in February unanimously rejected the plans over concerns over how the scheme would impact of the South Hams Special Area of Conservation, the lack of early delivery of the link road, and the inadequate protection for the Wolborough Fen.

 

But the rejected application was a duplicate application of a 1,275 homes scheme – subsequently revised to 1,210 homes – that PCL Planning had appealed against the non-determination by the council of.

Aerial view of the NA3 Wolborough Masterplan
Aerial view of the NA3 Wolborough Masterplan

A planning inquiry, held by the Planning Inspectorate, to determine the fate of the original application will take place from Tuesday, March 26, at the Forde House HQ of Teignbridge.

The inquiry is set to last for four days, although no evidence will be heard on Friday, March 29, and must finish no later than Tuesday, April 2, to accommodate the inspector.

 

Teignbridge District Council, the Rew Family, and the Wolborough Residents’ Association and Abbotskerswell Parish Council, who have been granted ‘Rule 6 status’, have also provided summary proofs of their evidence for the inquiry.

David Seaton, on behalf of PCL Planning, will tell the hearing that their scheme does accord with the Local Plan, in which the site is allocated for development in.

In grey, the land that will be built on as part of the plans for Wolborough
In grey, the land that will be built on as part of the plans for Wolborough

Mr Seaton said: “Economically, the proposed development would bring short-term advantages in respect of construction jobs and, in the longer-term, through the direct delivery of employment land. The proposed development would also be of wider benefit in terms of support for local shops, services and facilities. The appeal proposals will not produce a detrimental impact upon integrity of the South Hams SAC, nor the Wolborough Fen SSSI.

“Socially the appeal proposal will deliver significant benefits. These include a primary school, mixed use local centre, community facilities, public open space.

 

“While there will be a limited localised impact, but this was known when the allocation of the appeal site was made and this is not sufficient to significantly and demonstrably outweigh the substantive benefits. This proposal is in accordance with the development plan when read as a whole and this is a sustainable development that would cause no significant harm, let alone harm of such an extent that it significantly.”

But Chris Watts, acting on behalf of the Rule 6 party, said that the inspector should refuse the appeal, saying there is a need to assess the adverse impact on biodiversity, there is a need for an effective evaluation of air, noise and light pollution and that the proposal fails to comply with local and national planning policy.

The Wolborough Masterplan
The Wolborough Masterplan

He also added the concern that the application was premature and made before the relevant planning policy allocations for NA3 had been completed and the ‘masterplan’ prepared by the developer.

 

Ian Perry, principal planning officer for Teignbridge, will tell the inspector the plans should be dismissed, due to environmental concerns and that the link road would be delivered after 500 homes are occupied, rather than 300.

He said: “There remain concerns in relation to the impact of the development upon the Greater Horseshoe Bat population, in that the necessary assessments under the Habitat Regulations are not able to be completed due to the lack of comprehensive and up to date data. It would not be appropriate to allow the appeal on this basis.

“The timing for the delivery of the link road remains too late in the development programme if the appellant’s preference is taken. This has the effect of the allocation being developed in smaller areas which may not be properly connected for some time. This prevents the site being able to be properly serviced by a bus service at the crucial early stages of the development when habits by those first residents can form.

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“Notwithstanding the benefits of the development, it is considered the late delivery of the link road and the uncertainty over the protection of the Greater Horseshoe Bats are reasons for the development not to be successful at this stage. There are no material considerations to suggest that the appeal should succeed in spite of these issues.”

Aerial view of Wolborough Barton, Newton Abbot
Aerial view of Wolborough Barton, Newton Abbot

He added that even if the NA3 site is taken out of site allocated for development, the council can still demonstrate a five year land supply and so development at Wolborough is not required to meet housing targets.

Samantha Taylor, from Jacobs UK Limited, representing Devon County Council as a witness on highways matters, added: “It is my view that the occupation of the whole development without the link road in place would have a severe detrimental impact on the local road network and limit the travel options available to residents resulting in an unsustainable development.

“If the link road and bus service was provided at 300 homes, I consider the development to have an acceptable short term adverse impact on the local road network and transport options, providing that a condition can be agreed to secure delivery of the link road at this point.

 

“But at 500 dwellings, I consider that the adverse impacts of the development would be unacceptable even if the link road was provided at 500 dwellings. Occupation of 500 dwellings would result in the Halcyon Road / Highweek Street signalised junction operation reaching theoretical capacity, which I consider to be a severe impact. The traffic flow on Wolborough Street towards Newton Abbot in the AM peak would increase by 15 per cent, which would result in an increase in queue length and length of time queues are present through an area of (currently) poor air quality.

“If a suitable condition cannot be agreed for the early delivery of the link road then planning permission should be refused.”

Newton Says No campaigners outside the council offices prior to the meeting
Newton Says No campaigners outside the council offices prior to the meeting

Cheers rung out from the public gallery when the duplicate application was rejected by the planning committee in February, and the Newton Says No campaigners, who say they will never stop fighting against controversial proposals to turn the rolling green hills of Wolborough into a “concrete jungle”, say their main ‘raison d’être’ is to get the NA3 site removed from the Local Plan.

 

But the Wolborough site remains a part of the Local Plan, and from May, Teignbridge will have to deliver 777 new homes a year.

Teignbridge District Council’s Leader Cllr Jeremy Christophers said: “The aim is to provide a robust and resilient Local Plan which takes all this into account. The countryside is at risk of a development-free-for-all if we don’t have a Local Plan with a supply of deliverable sites to meet housing supply targets. We do not want this to happen.

“In the case of Wolborough, the site was put forward by the landowner as a potential development opportunity through the Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment in 2012. The ecology of the Wolborough area – and other areas allocated for development – were considered as part of a rigorous assessment process in the Local Plan preparation and this work continues.

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Jailed in Devon

“Plan-making is a balancing act that evolves constantly. We know people have concerns about development at Wolborough and we have been meeting with Wolborough Residents’ Association and Abbotskerswell Parish Council throughout. We would welcome a representative of Newton Says No coming to those meetings so we can have a meaningful conversation with them too.”

Artist impression of Wolborough Barton hotel plans
Artist impression of Wolborough Barton hotel plans

A council spokesman added that Teignbridge’s varied geography, ranging from coastal resorts along 22 miles of coast, two river estuaries, market towns, rural countryside and moorland, in planning terms naturally constrains where and how the district can be developed.

Areas where there are mineral rights for ball clay, a world resource which is mined from the Bovey Basin and exported from Teignmouth, flooding risks posed by the rivers, estuaries and coast, internationally protected coast and countryside sites such as the Exe Estuary and Dawlish Warren, a network of caves which are home to a significant proportion of the British population of Greater Horseshoe Bats, a European protected species and Dartmoor National Park receive the highest level of protection.

 

A spokesman added: “Laws exist to ensure any development affecting these sites must be subject to appropriate assessments before planning permission can be granted. It is also important to note that 162 sq miles of the district is within the Local Plan area and the rest falls within Dartmoor National Park, a separate planning authority with its own Local Plan.

Wolborough masterplan
Wolborough masterplan

“The Local Plan’s strategy and policies including the principle of the Wolborough allocation were examined in detail by councillors and the plan was the focus of what was then Teignbridge’s biggest-ever public consultation.

“The Local Plan was examined and approved by an independent Planning Inspector before being adopted by Full Council on May 6, 2014.

“The principle of development at Wolborough was scrutinised again in the High Court that same year when the Plan was subject to a Judicial Review brought by Abbotskerswell Parish Council. The claim was dismissed.”

 

The planning inquiry into the 1,210 homes plan takes place from Tuesday, March 26.

If the appeal is allowed, then a reserved matters application looking at the detail of the proposal would still need to be granting planning permission could begin on the 1,210 homes scheme.

Neighbours claim ‘David and Goliath’ win in battle to save woodland

Neighbours fighting to save an area of protected woodland have won a temporary reprieve – and now they want to have the area classed as a village green to keep it safe in the future.

Residents of Kingsway and Broadmeadow View in Teignmouth and local councillor David Cox are claiming a ‘David and Goliath’ win after contractors withdrew an appication to clear paths through the area of woodland.

Cllr Cox says the land is technically protected in Plan Teignbridge as ‘Undeveloped Coast’.

Terrence Stone Construction has withdrawn its application for permission to cutback tracks of land in the woodland and now says it will carry out further “site survey and investigation works”.

 

Locals say the woodland is a habitat for wildlife. The RSPB has sent Teignbridge Council a consultation letter opposing the plan because of the disruption to nesting birds.

Broadmeadow View resident Marcia Smyth said: “The woodland has fantastic wildlife and should be conserved, not ruined. Many children use the woodland to play.”

Cllr Cox added: “This goes to show that in a  David and Goliath  situation it is possible for ordinary people to overcome all the odds and win. A big thank you goes to tenacious campaigners Marcia Smyth, Andy Henderson and Roley Williams, their quick actions saved the day.

“These trees bring vibrant bird life and colour, providing natural habitat for many local species. We must preserve this woodland.

 

“We’d like to register this land as a ‘Village Green’ so this area can continue to benefit local residents with a wide variety of community-based recreational activities. As it has for many years.”

Local residents of Kingsway and Broadmeadow View are extremely concerned about the planned destruction of a number of old growth trees and impact on wildlife in the small woodland between Broadmeadow Industrial Estate and Kingsway.

Terrance Stone Construction are seeking permission to cutback tracks of land in the woodland residents and local councillor David Cox fear this is the prelude to seeking to develop the site, even through it is technically protected in Plan Teignbridge as ‘Undeveloped Coast’.

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You can have your say by email to  planning@teignbridge.gov.uk , or by post to Planning, Teignbridge District Council, Forde House, Brunel Road, Newton Abbot, TQ12 4XX. Please quote 19/00160/TPO

The supermarket rumoured to have snapped up Waitrose Torquay and Teignmouth

It appears the Torquay and Teignmouth branches of Waitrose won’t be empty for long after they close this summer.

Waitrose & Partners dropped a bombshell yesterday when it confirmed that they are pulling out of the seaside towns after struggling to find a away to make each branch “commercially sustainable.”

In its announcement, the high-end supermarket chain confirmed that it had already sold the two sites “to another retailer.”

German chain Lidl is rumoured to be the retailer in question, reportedly adding them to its roster of more than 10,000 branches across Europe and the US.

The budget supermarket giant has been mentioned countless times on social media in relation to the sale. The chain has also opened a brand new branch nearby in Paignton.

We approached Lidl for more, but they are unable to comment on the matter.

Waitrose Torquay and Waitrose Teignmouth will close for good on Sunday, June 9 2019.

It means the closest branches for shoppers in South Devon will be Exeter, off Heavitree Road, and Okehampton, at School Way.

Everything Waitrose said

A spokesperson for Waitrose & Partners told Devon Live yesterday: “We can confirm that we have exchanged contracts to sell our Waitrose shops in Teignmouth and Torquay to another retailer, which regrettably means we will close there on June 9.

“The acquiring party has informed us that they will be undertaking works to both units for an extended period of time with plans likely to be shared at a later date.

“We will be meeting with the 111 Partners who work at Teignmouth and 96 Partners who work at Torquay to ensure they are fully supported and will identify suitable opportunities for those wishing to remain with the business wherever possible.”

 

Waitrose & Partners Regional Manager, Krys Jantzen: “We have taken great pride in being part of the Teignmouth and Torquay communities so the sale of these shops is not something we take lightly, but we have sadly not been able to find a way to make the stores commercially sustainable in the long-term.

“Our priority is our Partners working in these shops who will be fully supported throughout the process and we will identify opportunities for those wishing to remain with the business wherever possible.”

The reaction

Councillor Richard Younger-Ross, Mayor June Green, Chris Reynard opening branch manager, Partner Joanne Gill, Anne Marie Morris MP, Ryan Whittaker, Waitrose department manager at opening of Waitrose Teignmouth in 2014
Councillor Richard Younger-Ross, Mayor June Green, Chris Reynard opening branch manager, Partner Joanne Gill, Anne Marie Morris MP, Ryan Whittaker, Waitrose department manager at opening of Waitrose Teignmouth in 2014

Cllr Sylvia Russell, a Teignmouth councillor who is Executive lead for Health and Wellbeing on Teignbridge Council, said: “It is devastating and I think they are making the wrong business decision.

“There’s so much going on in Teignmouth and they’ve only got to look at the local plan to see how much Teignbridge is expanding, if only they would look further than the end of their noses. I hope they will reconsider,” she said.

She said that the Waitrose brand is ‘set apart’ from other supermarkets.

‘We welcome Waitrose and we like having such a well respected brand in our town. There are a lot of people around who are happy to spend a lot of money in Waitrose. It is a real shame.”

 

In Torquay, Susie Colley, Chairman of Torquay Chamber of Commerce described the loss as a blow for the town.

“If Waitrose has lost confidence then that’s a bad omen for Torquay.

“When Waitrose opened it lifted the whole demeanour of Plainmoor, they kept the place nice and tidy and it attracted well heeled people from all around to shop there.

Kevin Martin on Torquay’s Waitrose closure

“I’m not sure any other supermarket would have the same effect.”

At the Hair Royale salon opposite Waitrose Torquay, Chris Cotton and Nina Chadwick were shocked by the news.

Chris said: “I had no idea it was closing. We use Waitrose daily and it brings in a lot of business – I’ve had two customers today who came out of there and saw us.

“We were always surprised how well that Waitrose did over there. It bought a group of Somerfield supermarkets and this one out-performed all the other smaller Waitroses we were told.”

Kevin Martin, who lives in nearby Bronshill Road, was totally shocked by the news as he left Waitrose. He said: “Wow! Wow! I always come here. I’m in shock. I can’t believe it’s shutting. It’s always busy. But I must admit I’ve always said it’s too posh for Plainmoor.”

 

What’s the future of Teignmouth’s ‘real-life Fawlty Towers’?

A hotel dubbed as a ‘real-life Fawlty Towers’ should be bought by the town council and run as a social enterprise, councillors have claimed.

The Bay Hotel, on Powderham Terrace, on Teignmouth seafront, has been closed since 2017 after the proprietor Shirley Bothroyd was arrested for Arson with Intent.

Bothroyd subsequently was jailed for 22 weeks for a string of assaults against her employees and a police officer, before then being given a hospital order after she threatened to burn down her neighbour’s house in an argument over her pet lizard.

Calls are now being made by councillors for direct action to be taken to deal with The Bay Hotel through compulsory purchase as the hotel in a prime seafront spot is failing into decay and has been derelict for nearly two years.

 

Cllr Alison Eden is proposing that the town council compulsorily purchase The Bay hotel using borrowings from the Public Works Loan Board.

She said: “Teignmouth’s former ‘Fawlty Towers’ Hotel is fast falling into decay and dilapidation. This grand building is becoming a poor advert for our glorious town and action needs to be taken now.”

Shirley Bothroyd, who owns the Bay Hotel, has plead not guilty to assaulting five people and a police officer
Shirley Bothroyd, who owns the Bay Hotel, has plead not guilty to assaulting five people and a police officer

The current status of the building is unknown, with town councillors have been unable to contact Bothroyd since she was sectioned.

Former hospitality manager Andrew MacGregor has put forward a proposal to run the hotel as a social enterprise.

He added: “I’d relish the opportunity to help run the establishment as a top-quality boutique hotel operated also as a social enterprise training centre. It could provide those young people not academically inclined and in some case marginalized with a vocational career option.

“I’m concerned in particular about how we can help the 8.2 per cent of young people who are not in education, employment or training in our town.”

Female hotelier dubbed female Basil Fawlty writes series of epic rants from prison complaining about cell mates and life inside

Cllr Peter Williams, who is also a local businessman, said that it was an option he was interested in exploring, adding: “We should certainly explore this further. I don’t want to see yet another part of this town deteriorate. Surely it’s ‘win/win’ if we can preserve the building and create opportunities for our young people.

“The town council could sell the building on directly as a hotel of course, but I like the idea of using a social enterprise to help our young people and put money back into the council’s coffers. It could generate regular income for the council at a time of uncertainty and cuts.”

The hotel was notorious and dubbed the ‘Fawlty Towers’ of South Devon, including via a series of damning and scathing reviews of the hotel on TripAdvisor.

No decision on the future of the hotel has been made and the town council has been unable to contact Bothroyd as the owner of the building to establish her intentions.

 

Waitrose confirms that more stores are set to close this summer

Waitrose has announced that it will close two more of its stores elsewhere in the country, following on from the bombshell that two of its Devon supermarkets will close .

The Waitrose store in Barry will close in June, while the supermarket in Ashbourne, Derbyshire is shutting in order to be turned into a Poundstretcher .

And the Waitrose supermarket in Blaby, Leicestershire will be the fifth store to close, shutting its doors for the final time on June 16.

A spokesman from Waitrose said the company has exchanged contracts to sell the shop in Barry to Anlo Properties.

“Anlo Properties has informed us that they will be undertaking works to the unit for an extended period of time with plans likely to be shared at a later date, the spokesman said.

“We will be meeting with our 122 Partners who work at the store to ensure they are fully supported and will identify suitable opportunities for those wishing to remain with the business wherever possible.”

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A statement from Waitrose & Partners regional manager, Alistair Bullock, said: “We have taken great pride in being part of the Barry community for almost 15 years so the sale of the shop is not something we take lightly, but we have sadly not been able to find a way to make the shop commercially sustainable in the long-term.

Waitrose Teignmouth
Waitrose Teignmouth

“Our priority is our Partners working there who will be fully supported throughout the process and we will identify opportunities for those wishing to remain with the business wherever possible.”

Frozen food specialist Iceland is believed to be considering taking over the unit.

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Meanwhile Waitrose says its 53 staff at their Ashbourne store are being ‘fully supported’, ahead of the store being closed.

Waitrose says contracts have now been exchanged for the sale of the store. That means Ashbourne’s store will close its doors for good on Sunday, June 16.

Waitrose and Partners regional manager, Andy Woodcock says the company has been unable to make the supermarket “sustainable”.

It is unknown who has bought the Waitrose site in Blaby, but plans for the store are expected to be revealed soon.

The confirmation comes shortly after Waitrose announced that its stores in Torquay and Teignmouth will close, also in June.

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According to a family member of one of the 207 partner’s affected, the announcement was made at Plainmoor, the Torquay United FC ground, this morning.

A spokesperson for  Waitrose & Partners said: “We can confirm that we have exchanged contracts to sell our Waitrose shops in Teignmouth and Torquay to another retailer, which regrettably means we will close there on June 9.

“The acquiring party has informed us that they will be undertaking works to both units for an extended period of time with plans likely to be shared at a later date.

Watch the video above and below to find out what people thought of Teignmouth being accused of being ‘faded’

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“We will be meeting with the 111 partners who work at Teignmouth and 96 partners who work at Torquay to ensure they are fully supported and will identify suitable opportunities for those wishing to remain with the business wherever possible.

Waitrose & Partners  regional manager, Krys Jantzen: “We have taken great pride in being part of the Teignmouth and Torquay communities so the sale of these shops is not something we take lightly, but we have sadly not been able to find a way to make the stores commercially sustainable in the long-term.”

“Our priority is our partners working in these shops who will be fully supported throughout the process and we will identify opportunities for those wishing to remain with the business wherever possible.”

Teignmouth’s  Waitrose & Partners  opened in March 2014 in what used to be the town’s big Co-Op on Lower Brook Street.

Torquay’s smaller  Waitrose & Partners  opened in 2009, replacing Somerfield on St Marychurch Road.

How did customers react?

Sophie Lowe said she was ‘devastated’ when told the news by Devon Live reporter Colleen Smith: “I live in St Marychurch and this is my closest supermarket. It’s the best one around. My dad lives in Ellacombe and he will be devastated when I tell him.”

Sophie Lowe on Torquay’s Waitrose closure

Kevin Martin, who lives in nearby Bronshill Road, was totally shocked by the news as he left Waitrose. He said: “Wow! Wow! I always come here. I’m in shock. I can’t believe it’s shutting. It’s always busy. But I must admit I’ve always said it’s too posh for Plainmoor.”

Doug Perry, who works at Torbay Hospital, was upset by the news: “Everything we eat is based around what we get from here. We live in Windsor Road and we are regular customers every couple of days.”

Julie and Kevin Shadbolt run the nearby Alvaston Hotel. They said: “It’s awful that it’s closing. We shop here all the time and we’ve been coming here for five years.”

Julie and Kevin Shadbolt

At the Hair Royale salon opposite Waitrose, Chris Cotton and Nina Chadwick were also shocked by the news but Nina said: “I hope it’s going to be a Lidl – I would love a Lidl because Waitrose is expensive and I spend a lot popping in there.”

Nina Chadwick and Chris Cotton

Business owner Chris Cotton added: “I had no idea it was closing. We use Waitrose daily and it brings in a lot of business – I’ve had two customers today who came out of there and saw us. We were always surprised how well that Waitrose did over there. Waitrose bought a group of Somerfield supermarkets and this one out-performed all the other smaller Waitroses we were told.”

At the Union Inn pub opposite drinkers had mixed views. They said they hoped the new supermarket has toilets because Waitrose customers were always using theirs.

Dave Bratcher said: “We are hoping that Aldi or Lidl goes in there because it will suit the area better.”

Dave Woodward said that the two cash machines at Waitrose had been closed for two months so he was not surprised by the news that it’s closing: “Basically it’s a community area and it needs a community shop – as long as it’s not empty. I remember it being empty years ago when it was Phil Reed’s garage – when that closed it was empty for years.”

Dave Woodward

Cllr Sylvia Russell, a Teignmouth councillor who is Executive lead for Health and Wellbeing on Teignbridge Council, said: “It is devastating and I think they are making the wrong business decision.

“There’s so much going on in Teignmouth and they’ve only got to look at the local plan to see how much Teignbridge is expanding, if only they would look further than the end of their noses. I hope they will reconsider,” she said.

She said that the Waitrose and Partners brand is ‘set apart’ from other supermarkets.

‘We welcome Waitrose and we like having such a well respected brand in our town. There are a lot of people around who are happy to spend a lot of money in Waitrose. It is a real shame.”

In Torquay, Susie Colley, Chairman of Torquay Chamber of Commerce described the loss of Waitrose as a blow for the town.

“If Waitrose has lost confidence then that’s a bad omen for Torquay.

“When Waitrose opened it lifted the whole demeanour of Plainmoor, they kept the place nice and tidy and it attracted well heeled people from all around to shop there.

“I’m not sure any other supermarket would have the same effect.”

What the retail experts think

Speaking with Devon Live business reporter Hannah FinchJohn Kinsey, Leisure and retail expert with JLL in Exeter said that the loss of Waitrose would not have a downward effect on the area.

He said: “When Waitrose moves in, it tends to be used as a benchmark for other retailers looking to open up in areas that attract a similar demographic to Waitrose. But I don’t see it having a downward effect when a Waitrose closes.”

He explained that the stores were bought by Waitrose as part of a wider portfolio when Somerfield was bought by the Co-Op and had to shed stores for reasons of competition.

“Waitrose and Partners is looking to rationalise its portfolio and I suspect that these are locations that are not trading particularly well so perhaps being taken over by a different retailer makes sense.”

Though there are no suggestions as to who will take over the sites, it is not all bad news if the budget retailers like Aldi or Lidl take over.

Last year, a report by Lloyds Bank found that homes near Waitrose are most likely to command a higher than average price.

But homes near budget supermarkets like Aldi and Lidi have seen the biggest boost in value over the past four years.

Mr Kinsey said: “I’m a big fan of the budget operators because they give a good offer and have come in and filled a good chunk of the market that had not been filled for a long time in the UK.

He said that shoppers looking for quality gormet items were just as likely to shop there as those on a budget.

He added: “I’m a big fan of Aldi’s Christmas 30-year old malt whisky. You’d never know it cost £50.”

A spokesman for Teignbridge Council said: “We are saddened to hear the decision by Waitrose & Partners to close its Teignmouth store and feel for those affected.”

What Waitrose said

A spokesperson for Waitrose & Partners said: “We can confirm that we have exchanged contracts to sell our Waitrose shops in Teignmouth and Torquay to another retailer, which regrettably means we will close there on June 9.

“The acquiring party has informed us that they will be undertaking works to both units for an extended period of time with plans likely to be shared at a later date.

Torquay's branch opened in 2009 with branch manager Chris Reynard at the helm
Torquay’s branch opened in 2009 with branch manager Chris Reynard at the helm

“We will be meeting with the 111 Partners who work at Teignmouth and 96 Partners who work at Torquay to ensure they are fully supported and will identify suitable opportunities for those wishing to remain with the business wherever possible.

Waitrose & Partners Regional Manager, Krys Jantzen: “We have taken great pride in being part of the Teignmouth and Torquay communities so the sale of these shops is not something we take lightly, but we have sadly not been able to find a way to make the stores commercially sustainable in the long-term.”

“Our priority is our Partners working in these shops who will be fully supported throughout the process and we will identify opportunities for those wishing to remain with the business wherever possible.”